Category: Uncategorized

Cerberus

Authors Luo Yi Tan and Ashley Baron-Moore

Control Cerberus, the three headed guard dog of the underworld, and prevent the residents from escaping while keeping the living from sneaking in. Use your arms to control the left and right heads, and use them to pick up the unwanted escapees and people sneaking in to feed them to the middle head. You can also control the middle head by tilting your own head left and right.

It’s Kinect-controlled, so you obviously need a kinect to run it. You also need the SimpleOpenNI library, which you can download here .

Unfortunately I don’t have a Mac build, but here’s a windows build with a readme: Build

Source code:  Source

Deep Dark


Author Marlena Abraham

After an unfortunate spelunking accident, you are trapped in a cave with no light source but your dying camera. With luck, you can navigate the cave’s twisting passages and find another way to the surface. It’s unfortunate that you’ve never been very lucky.

Deep Dark Playthrough from Marlena Abraham on Vimeo.

Controls: WASD to move, left mouse button to look, Shift+i+z for emergency restart.

Windows Download

Mac Download

OVUM

Authors Zhen Geng (Programming) and Heather Cowie (Graphic/UI/SoundEffect Design)

Description  A soft-body bubble monster try to travel in an eternal  tunnel. Use your two hands’ gesture to control the monster’s shape as well as  it’s  movement to smoothly travel through the tunnel. It will explode if you stretch too much!

Instructions

  1. Plug in the Kinect before run the application
  2. When the Kinect recognize your gesture, press space to start; move the control circle to the target point to get familiar with the control method
  3. Separate your arms to grow wider /bring them together to grow thinner /lift them your arms to go faster /lower them to go slower

Source Github

 

Face Fighter

Author: Joel Simon

Description: Placed in head-to-head combat two faces must fight it out for survival. The whole game is controlled by the players faces. Players can fire speech bubbles out of their mouths, aim them with their eyebrows and form shields by closing their eyes. The result is a lot of funny faces made by both players. The faces also move around the screen dodging speech bubbled and gathering power. Too much movement risks being lost by the face tracker, while too little also leaves you vulnerable. Staying far away from the screen makes one a smaller target but will also make their attacks weaker since the speech bubbles will be smaller.

Instructions:  FaceOSCSyphon.app must be running in the background. Then run the exported processing sketch for windows/osx. Enter your friends ip address and play.

Sauce: github

Feelers

     

Author Collin Burger

Feelers is an interactive installation with game elements in which two participants control the environment with skin to skin contact.  Participants are attached to the installation and instructed to match colored lights and the frequency of two sine waves by varying the area and pressure of skin contact.  Spectators are treated to a voyeuristic display of the players’ actions that possesses the quality of a foreign ritual. Feelers invites participants and spectators to explore each other’s bodies and investigate the notions of personal space.

*Feelers is funded in part by the Frank-Ratchye Fund for Art at the Frontier.

Code

micro

Author Mark Strelow.

In “micro,” the player must click and drag to position a line, and release to cut through the core group of cells. If the drawn line passes between a cell and the center of the group, that cell will be separated. The severed cells will move away from the center perpendicular to the line drawn. The goal of the game is to keep at least one cell alive for as long as possible, by cutting off an appropriate number of cells to deal with approaching enemies.

Part of the challenge of the game is shooting in the correct direction, but allocating an ideal number of cells can also be difficult. Red enemies absorb 10 cells before exploding and absorbing any cells within this wider radius. Packs of blue enemies grow larger as they get closer, and fighting them always takes 5 seconds. If you have fewer cells than their group you will lose the fight, equal numbers will result in both groups being depleted, and having more will result in less casualties on your side. Thus, you want to allocate enough cells to win the fight with minimal losses, but (if you sent too many) you might not have enough in the core group for other tasks while they fight.

You lose the game eventually no matter what, so the goal is just to survive as long as possible. A time of 30 seconds is average, over 60 is good, and over 80 is very impressive. The enemies’ spawning time is a bit randomized, so it is possible to get lucky (or unlucky) in a particular round.

I can’t quite get the executables to work after download because something with the minim sound library isn’t working. In the meantime, here is the dropbox link to the code:

Source Code

Mirror Mirror

Author Andre Le

Mirror mirror is a collaborative multi-screen multiplayer puzzle game spanning 3 computers located next to each other. Each level contains one or more lasers, mirrors, and circular targets in a puzzle-like configuration. The 3 players are able to move and rotate the mirrors to bounce lasers across multiple screens. The goal of the game is to pass the laser(s) through all of the targets. In many situations, players are dependent on other players and must discuss strategies in order to effectively use the provided mirrors and lasers.

Download

Instructions:

  1. Navigate to the “server” folder from within the OSX terminal.
  2. To start the server, type in “java -jar mpeServer-2.0.2.jar -framerate60”
  3. Each player has a corresponding folder (e.g. Player1, Player2, Player3) that contains an “mpe.xml” file
  4. To configure the server, edit the mpe.xml file and change the <ip>xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx</ip> to the ip of the server
  5. To start the game, open the .app file in the corresponding Player folders

Deconstruct

Author Alex Lee

Interactive fiction about the nature of fiction, wrapped in sci-fi horror. Superficially references Nietzsche. Originally fan fiction for House of Leaves.

This is only the first chapter (red passages indicate new chapters). This is not a game, there are no decisions to make. The expanding passages are solely for narrative and thematic effect. All instructions within.

Made in Processing (no additional libraries). Download the ZIP file and open it. Versions for Windows and Mac along with the source code within.

Click here to download ZIP.

Elemental Body

Author: Luke Schenker

Concept: Each level is a classical element, which are wind, water, fire, and earth (in order) which are expressed through how the level is laid out. In the first 3 levels the player directs the balls to the target platforms. For the last one the player holds up the balls until they dissipate. In more detail:

Level 1: Wind
Players act as the wind, and direct objects to targets on either side

Level 2: Water
Players guide the flow of the water to pouring from above to the target below

Level 3: Fire
Players guide sparks from the fire below to the target above as they float up into the sky

Level 4: Earth
Players catch rocks and hold them up until they erode away

Overall I was happy with how the game came together, and even happier with the response from the people at the little play fair we had. I was a bit skeptical of how fun the game actually was, but lots of people asked to play it and kept me busy most of the 3 hours of the fair! Bunches of kids were even laughing and having a really fun time playing, as were their friends laughing along with the “yoga” like poses they were making. Several times I was about to grab pizza but there were people asking to play next, so I had to oblige and root em on 🙂

Download the source code and necessary libraries here!

Tutorial (I used) to get the Kinect running on my machine which includes links to all software and drivers needed, except the  SimpleOpenNI driver which can be downloaded HERE.

When running using Processing, the first time you run it it won’t work, so just stop the program (WITHOUT QUITTING PROCESSING) and run it again, give it about 30 sec and it should boot up fine.

If you want to try running the exported application instead of using the source, libraries, and kinect install its worth a shot, but I couldn’t get the standalone application working. It can be downloaded HERE

alex new proposal

Scavenging/Crafting

Gather animals, plants, machines, and other objects from various environments and tear them into their components (my current broad categories are body, mind, soul, and time). Organize these components in a ‘library’, and combine them to make new objects and materials. You can eventually build your own living, intelligent creatures, structures, and objects.

The nature and complexity of the crafting is my main concern. I played Doodle God and Doodle Devil, and was frustrated by how lots of things didn’t combine that logically should. I felt restricted by the developer’s limitations. Some ways to solve the issue for this game might be:

1) Make materials individual modifiers rather than elements of a whole, so that you can combine any materials to form a basic ‘creature’ with modifiers attached to it. This approach is similar to the creature stage in Spore. An example might be if you have a “predatory behavior” material you got from a bird, you could apply that to your formative creature and it would then follow that AI. This is the least interesting approach in my opinion.
2) Require specific materials to craft a new distinct object, but you can add any amount of each material. The new object would have a modifier depending on how you deviated from the ‘right’ recipe.
3) Divide materials into categories, and recipes require anything from those categories. This way you can substitute similar materials (like steel and copper) and have a similar end product.
4) Materials have descriptions or tags to suggest their nature and purpose, and you learn more and more methods to ‘discover’ recipes during the game.

My current conception of ‘crafting’ is the same as existing games like Minecraft, Don’t Starve, TLOU, etc. (combine objects to form more complex objects based on recipes). I don’t know if this type of system is interesting, or if there’s a different way to craft. Two important things I want to emphasize are: ‘recipes’ should be figured out through logic and trial-and-error; and the game shouldn’t reject ‘incorrect’ combinations.

I probably won’t be able to make a game with a narrative in the time frame of this class, but if I did, it might involve building objects of increasing complexity, unlocking more materials and methods of creation. Your creatures and automata give you access to additional areas, like the forest, the shore, the mountain, below the earth, the sky, etc. As you build more complex creatures and structures, you have to deal with the ethical and logistical implications of sentient and emotional beings. The overall goal is open-ended, but the fact that you’re constructing these creatures suggest that you might want to 1) build a ‘perfect’ creature, or 2) build a creature more intelligent than you. One thing to note is that it doesn’t have to be limited to ‘creatures’, you could make inanimate objects and more complex elements.

The idea of deconstructing and constructing objects has some philosophical implications I don’t really understand, but here’s some Wiki links I was looking at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontology
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bundle_theory
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_(philosophy)

Heather + Zhen Final

Reworking of the “bubble” game, in which the physical properties of the bubble are manipulated by kinect gesture. Use arm movements to control the size of the bubble to navigate a tunnel-like scrolling level. Fit through spaces, avoid obstacles to progress.

Timeline:

-By Wednesday:
-Samples of aesthetics/colors/styles
-finish control part (partially)
-11/11
-Finalize appearance/level design
-finalize mechanics choices
-11/13
-Finish character appearance/behavior
-start working on building levels/environment
-11/18
-Finish Levels/ UI in general (including designing what these look like
-11/20
-Combine elements together to begin polishing
-11/25
-Sound /Polish more
-12/1
-Done

Final Proposal – John Brieger

Asteroid Dogfight Local Multiplayer Game:

I’m really interested in the split screen multitouch paradigm, and I think its a really fun way to game.  This game comes from the 50 game ideas jam.

I’m thinking of a dogfight game in the asteroids style kind of 360 degree movement with thrust.  Ships are very small relative to map size.  You can lay traps, fire bullets, maybe some sort of team type game.

Each play has a ship on their iDevice that they can control thrusters/boost/weapons on. a shared battlefield map is displayed on a projector/TV

Nov. 11: Basic Server/Client functionality, movement working

Nov. 13 bullets and collision

Nov. 18 Bonjour Service integration, autodection for player counts, connections, etc

Nov. 25 level design, and art

Dec. 1 Polish, make super easy to set up

Cerberus Game

by Luo and Ashley

So you play as Cerberus, the three headed dog that guards the underworld. Prevent spirits from escaping and prevent the living from sneaking in. You’re not allowed to eat spirits, but you’re allowed to eat the living.

It will have kinect controls, with one person puppeteering the three heads. It will be in 2D for ease of animation/art.

Milestones:

Nov 11: Get Processing + Kinect movement working, with basic shapes to represent heads

Nov 18: Get enemies working, work out Cerberus art

Nov 25: Work out bugs and balance, enemy art

Dec 1: Finalize Art, polish.

 

Mark Strelow – Staring Contest Fighter – Final Proposal

I have had the idea of making a simple fighter using somewhere between 2 and 4 buttons. The basic idea is that, if a player is able to react quick enough to an opponent’s attack, they will have the opportunity to get off an attack of their own. When we started talking about face tracking, I thought it could be interesting to have the idea of a staring contest. My original idea seemed like it might encourage people to stay still, because if they failed an attack they would be left open for a counterattack. I think that including the idea of a staring contest would add a factor that forces the two players to eventually engage.

Planned Milestones:

November 11: Get the general layout for the fighter down.

November 18: Get the blink detection working.

November 25: Combine the two in a way that feels balanced.

December 1: Finish everything up.

Final Proposal – Luke Schenker

Proposal:
Make a physics game for Kinect as opposed to the facial recognition; this makes for more possible objectives (such that you can contort your body much more than your face). In addition, the facial recognition is buggy when the head is tilted too much, again limiting gameplay.

Objectives:
Nov 11th – Have kinect motion tracking running/understood, have objectives and gameplay details ironed out (proof of concept)
Nov 18th – Started implementing gameplay, some (½) art assets finished
Nov 25th – Gameplay finished, art assets in place
Dec 1st – Polish/debug, add splash screens

Collin Burger: Feelers Final Proposal

I’m going to polish up my touching game Feelers so that it can be presented as an interactive installation for a specially designed space or as a more portable game.

Tentative Plan:

  • Nov. 4 – 10: Continue balancing the game aspects and finish adding features.
  • Nov. 11 – 17: Make a decision on the physical features and layout of the game space and acquire necessary equipment. Continue polishing the game.
  • Nov. 18 – 24: Finish polishing the game and start to piece together the physical implements of the project.
  • Nov. 25 – Dec. 1: Do a bit of work on the physical implementations of the game when not out of town for Thanksgiving.
  • Dec. 2 – Due Date: Finish the physical implementation and test.

new multitouch proposal

I was thinking of more multitouch ideas and I think that’s the direction I’d like to go for the final project. I’ll continue my dream game during Senior Studio.

My idea is an iPod ship management roguelike in which you ‘activate’ rooms on a ship by pressing them with your fingers. A room only fulfills its tasks while you’re holding your finger on it (e.g. a kitchen makes meals for the crew, or a cannon fires). You can activate multiple rooms at once, but no more than the number of crew members you have. You begin with 1-2 crew and can go up to likely 4-6.

You have to balance provisions, speed, weapons, shields, gold, time, and other variables. You encounter enemy ships (represented by bars on either side of the screen), who fire and move towards you. How you position your rooms matters – if an enemy fires towards your left, rooms on the left side of your ship are more likely to get damaged. Once you get lots of crew and rooms, the game becomes extremely micro intensive because you have to keep switching between rooms. A combat sequence might involve you alternating between cannons and shields with one hand (you get an alert when the enemy is about to fire), while brewing a storm and clearing a flood with the other.

You also encounter ports where you can purchase rooms, recruit crew, repair your ship, and expand it to accommodate more rooms. The game gets more complex as your ship and number of crew gets larger. It has similarities to FTL and Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime.

My biggest concern is whether the game is too complex or cluttered for an iPod-type device. The interface, including the rooms, would mostly consist of simple symbols. I think as long as there’s not much text the audience can understand everything.

Deadlines:
Nov. 4 – Discuss concept
Nov. 10 – Play with multitouch, make proof of concept
Nov. 17 – Make prototype (no visuals)
Nov. 24 – Make first draft (with visuals), play test and balance
Dec. 1 – Finish final

DA MASTA PLAN – Monster Party/Monster Mash

This is Ziyun’s + MacKenzie’s + Tyler’s game! It is a game where you are trying to survive in a place full of monsters by imitating the noises made around you. This uses voice input to allow the user to attempt to mimic the pitch and rhythm (and maybe loudness) of the “calls” that the monsters make in the game. Imitate the calls properly and you won’t get eaten! Otherwise, you’ll get eaten!

Plan:

November 11: figure out OSCPitch, connect it to the game “engine”, and figure out voice rhythm recognition, work on art for the characters and sound/music

November 18: make game mechanics and code the game using placeholders for visual elements, work on art for the characters and sound/music

November 25: make the game playable with OSCPitch with the game using placeholders; work on art for the characters and sound/music

December 2: add in art and sound; be presentable to play!

Door of Mirror – Face detection game

You are trapped in a haunted room, there are many doors with mirrors around the room walls. All the mirrors are dusty and dim that the reflection are blurred.

Only one mirror is the normal mirror that leads to the correct way out (maybe), and if you stare at one mirror too long, the image will become less clear and the ghost may come out from the mirror (game over)~

Try to find out the correct mirror with your face ~ Escape from the nightmare.

 

Multitouch

Multi-Touch

Perform short, meditative, playful actions in a series of minigames (like Dys4ia or Warioware). These minigames have no goal and serve to immerse the player in the story they imply. The main purpose of the touch interface is to make your actions seem more intimate and organic.

Possible actions include:
-Rubbing fog off a windowpane
-Running your fingers along your lover’s back
-Removing clothes
-Slicing vegetables for a meal
-Mixing a drink
-Scattering birds
-Dragging your feet through snow

Simultaneously manipulate multiple parts of a system or machine using your fingers. Each part must work in tandem in order for the system to operate properly. You can change the mechanics (and possibly the purpose) of the system by performing different actions, which the player can figure out themselves. This ‘toy’ tests multitasking, motor skill, and creativity.

‘Activate’ people by holding your fingers to the screen. Each finger your hold activates an additional person. You are more powerful/productive with more people, but each person you add causes internal conflicts within your group and weakens group harmony.

Face and Eyes Detection Game

SCP-173 game with more realistic experience. When your eyes are open, and stare at it, it is nothing more than a sculpture. When you close your eyes or stare anywhere else, it’s dangerous and unpredictable!

Control your direction with your face direction, and the character will blink when you blink.

Try to escape from the monster.

What’s SCP-173

Voice Control Game

A fighter game control by shouting out the name of your unique skills!

While in case to avoid the technical difficulty to do language recognition, can use some simple words or compare the voice with the sample voice.

Or you can control the movement with different pattern of voice (i.e.  shot and loud is jump etc.)

Andre: FaceOSC – Mug Shot

Game where you need to put on the appropriate face to get past people without drawing suspicion or trouble. The player is walking through a neighborhood and you need to smile at the police officers/citizens, and put on a mean face to avoid trouble from the gang members. If approached by a growling dog, you have to put on “yelling” expression to scare off the dog.

Implementation idea:

Cross-reference Google Street View and a Poverty-level API. You’re set in a start location and must put on the appropriate face to continue to the next “Street view location” and progress.

Collin Burger: Voice and Face Game

The Competitive Lying Game

I proposed this game before in the big proposal blast. Basically, there are two players and each take turns reading from a prompt and must lie to their opponent in order to score points. Each player is treated to a screen that is similar to the one below and face each other so they cannot read their opponent’s prompt but can easily read the other person’s face to see if they can tell if they are lying. The screen could display a particular facial feature that would be segmented using FaceOSC so that the player could closely examine their opponents face while they potentially lie. Using OSCVoice, players could also be treated to voice waveforms and pitch information to try to figure out what their opponent’s “tell” is.  If a player thinks that they are lying then they would press a button and if correct, the opponent would lose points, otherwise if it is a false alarm then the player loses points. Each turn would be timed and points would be scored for not truthfully reading each prompt. The challenge for creating this game would be writing and generating compelling text.

 

Luo Yi Tan: Embodiment – Face

So for face, I have two ideas:

Mask

You have to put on a mask for different situations, and maintain that expression on the mask for a period of time. For example, you have to maintain a smiling expression while you’re working at a cashier, or you have to maintain a sad expression during the funeral of someone you never liked very much.

Face runner

Your nose is running and the rest of your face has to to catch it. Use eyebrows and mouth to control two different things. eyebrows to make your character jump, and keep smiling to make your character run.

Luo Yi Tan: Embodiment – Voice

Siren Call

Use the pitch of your voice to attract seafarers to their doom. Have to start off low so they don’t notice you, and slowly get higher as they come closer. Let out a loud scream  once they’re close enough to disarm them and then consume them.

Luo Yi Tan: Embodiment – Body

Two ideas:

A Leaf in the Wind

Use your body to control the wind, blow a leaf to a place. The middle of a pond, on top of someone’s head, onto another pile of leaves. Kinect controlled. Something like Flower but with your body as a control.

Moonsong

Use your body to control tides/waves. Help rescue people that stray too far out, or drown them. Wash up broken bottles and see who finds them. Help a beached whale or let it die.

I could also work on my Cerberus game.

 

Andre: OSCVoice + Kinect: Cave In

 

Cave In is a game where players must avoid falling rocks inside of a cave using their body. Players can attempt to “push” falling debris away from them by making noise such as screaming or yelling. Rocks of different sizes/weight will fall at different speeds, and making noise will only deflect small rocks. Large falling rocks will only change trajectory so players must run and yell simultaneously. The goal is to survive until the end of the round.

Ideas

Face: Contort your face to avoid being recognized by people you wish to avoid, but pleasantly smile at people you want to remember you (presented with enemies/friends in rapid succession, so that you must react quickly (alternatively, make faces/track eye movement to be the most convincing liar)

Body: 2 player cooperative game to escape a monster, the monster is attracted by movement. strategically plan movements to advance but not draw attention. also strategically move to divert attention if your partner is in danger

 

Shine – weird dream game with weird mechanics

A dream-like game using optical illusions and out of body experience as the main mechanic. Players is trapped in the 3 dimensional maze, and has to find the way out. As showing in the following picture, player can change the maze structure by change perspective and find the way to pass.

Showed in the next picture, player saw someone when he passed a room, and when he passing the other room at a different place, the exact same scene happens again, but the difference is that the player becomes the one inside the room and see himself passing by, so it can be a clue that implies the environment is the same with the one before.

http://superhotgame.com/

http://store.steampowered.com/app/219890/

Luke’s Face idea!

SIMPLE! Use two points on your face (which change per round) to balance a physics object for a set amount of time. Gets tougher as time goes on, you get a higher score the less the object moves.

Kinect Body Game Idea

Like Lion Dance or 2-Person Horse,use Kinect to map two people’s joints to an animal’s  skeleton.

Game type can be:

  1.  Dance Game : Do a LionDance or HorseDance according to the screen pattern or mimic the character on screen.
  2. 2Adventure Game: Two people collaborate  to control the animal (the hero) to make movement to explore the game environment or complete some requests.

By zg

Shine – Kinect Game

An abstract game in which players use their body gesture to control the main character, and interact with the game world. For example, using hand to put the main character on the tree, or use the hand shaking to create wind and blow the main character(a balloon) to fly away from somewhere.

Body Game (Mark Strelow)

A game where you have to perform certain basic tasks, and you are rated on the amount of symmetry you are able to maintain while performing the actions. For example, if you need to pick something up, you need to move both arms together to complete the task.

Face – Performance/Penetration

You are an orator. Command a political party with your facial expressions, which might include anger, sympathy, determination, and vengeance. The appropriate expression depends on your current goal, the mood of your crowd, and current political trends (e.g. if your party is vilified in the media, an angry, contradictory expression won’t be fruitful).

Shine – Voice Game

An abstract game which will be played using voice input to create elements and have interactions with the game world to make meaningful interactions.

What is the meaningful interaction? Still figuring out…

Kinect – Affliction/Accumulation

You control a character afflicted by visual representations of their guilt, depression, and mental illnesses. Their movement is weighed down by barnacle-like creatures that are attached to the character’s body and worm-like creatures that grow within the character. You, as the player, must physically shake off these parasites and/or destroy them in some other way by moving your body. Your actions can inadvertently generate more creatures if they cause the character more pain. Part of the game is recognizing which actions are hurtful through trial-and-error.

Voice Game (Mark Strelow)

A narrative game where a narrator reads the story, but certain key words are left left unspoken. As the player, you have to say these words, and depending on certain aspects of your speech, the progression of the plot is affected. I’m not sure what would be checked, but maybe the tone and speed of what you say will determine the changes.

Voice – Abuse/Retaliation

Direct a child-like organism’s emotional and mental growth using voice. Modulate tone, pitch, and volume to reprimand and “punish” the organism as it reacts to other stimuli. Use psychological techniques like operant conditioning to manipulate the organism’s long-term behavior. Your goal is to riddle the organism with anxieties, phobias, and nervous tics until it is unable to function. The organism may lash back if provoked too suddenly or for too sustained a period.

Face Game (Mark Strelow)

A staring-contest fighter where if you blink, you are left vulnerable. Possibly the other controls are mapped to face movements as well, but not necessarily. You have to stay focused and react, while also making sure not to blink. The fighting would be simple, maybe just one button to attack and one button to defend.

OR

A platformer entirely controlled by face movements, where you blink to jump. If the face recognition is good enough to do this, the environment would change very slightly every time you blink, so that you might not notice it at first, but over time the changes build up. Maybe different mouth movements control running speed, like smiling makes you run faster and frowning makes you stop.

No Awkward PLS – Tyler’s Body game

A non-visual game where you try to find a target in the space around you; sound can indicate how close you are to the target. Story: ghost dating simulator, you are going on a date with your ghost partner and there are various things you want to do with your lover (hold hands, kiss, get third base). However, you can’t see the ghost so you have to be careful not to touch inappropriate places!!!!!!!!!! Can substitute imaginary friend from second grade with ghost.

What’s that?? – Tyler’s Face game

Maybe the idea I had where if you close you’re eyes the game gives more aural information. You’re looking for something in the game, and the target may make a small noise but if you close your eyes it would be easier to hear it. Obviously you need to open your eyes to navigate through the game. Other scenarios: you’re hiding from something approaching; you’re at a cocktail party and someone is calling your name; you are deactivating mines and you need to listen carefully to make sure you deactivate it properly; countless other possibilities.

Monster Party – Tyler’s Voice game

You’re stuck in a place with a bunch of monsters. The monsters make noises to communicate with each other, and you have to imitate the noises of the monsters around you (loudness and pitch recognition) so you aren’t eaten. However, there are different monsters around, and so you have to change your imitation to fit what monsters are around you (maybe you can move on your own too). Also, if you are with a group of A monsters and there is a group of B monsters trying to eat the A monsters, you have to switch your imitation from monster A to monster B so that you fit in with the more powerful monster.

Lukes Voice Idea!

Use your voice to manipulate a wave to push a ball into the opponents hoop. The higher your pitch your wave bumps closer to the center of the field of play, and the more volume to your voice the larger/more powerful the bump is.

Luke’s Kinect post!

SIMPLE! Make a kinect program which is essentially an interface for a synthesizer with a looping/recording feature. Kind of a futuristic interface kinda like avatar. It also allows for automation of track facets based upon movement, either going to use a custom made simple sequencer, or use a fully functional one such as Ableton running in the background, handling the inputs the kinect interface generates. Ok, maybe not so simple, but super awesome.

http://www.nl-rso.org/photos/hansvonk.jpg

ideas

1. Voice input game: You’re stuck in a place with a bunch of monsters. The monsters make noises to communicate with each other, and you have to imitate the noises of the monsters around you (loudness and pitch recognition) so you aren’t eaten. However, there are different monsters around, and so you have to change your imitation to fit what monsters are around you (maybe you can move on your own too). Also, if you are with a group of A monsters and there is a group of B monsters trying to eat the A monsters, you have to switch your imitation from monster A to monster B so that you fit in with the more powerful monster.

2. Face input game: Maybe the idea I had where if you close you’re eyes the game gives more aural information. You’re looking for something in the game, and the target may make a small noise but if you close your eyes it would be easier to hear it. Obviously you need to open your eyes to navigate through the game. Other scenarios: you’re hiding from something approaching; you’re at a cocktail party and someone is calling your name; you are deactivating mines and you need to listen carefully to make sure you deactivate it properly; countless other possibilities.

3. Body input game: A non-visual game where you try to find a target in the space around you; sound can indicate how close you are to the target. Story: ghost dating simulator, you are going on a date with your ghost partner and there are various things you want to do with your lover (hold hands, kiss, get third base). However, you can’t see the ghost so you have to be careful not to touch inappropriate places!!!!!!!!!! Can substitute imaginary friend from second grade with ghost.

3 Ideas for Monday

Voice
Direct a child-like organism’s emotional and mental growth using voice. Modulate tone, pitch, and volume to reprimand and “punish” the organism as it reacts to other stimuli. Use psychological techniques like operant conditioning to manipulate the organism’s long-term behavior. Your goal is to riddle the organism with anxieties, phobias, and nervous tics until it is unable to function.
Kinect
You control a character afflicted by visual representations of their guilt, depression, and mental illnesses. Their movement is weighed down by barnacle-like creatures that are attached to the character’s body and worm-like creatures that grow within the character. You, as the player, must physically shake off these parasites and/or destroy them in some other way by moving your body.
Expression
You are an orator. Command a political party with your facial expressions, which might include anger, sympathy, determination, and vengeance. The appropriate expression depends on your current goal, the mood of your crowd, and current political trends (e.g. if your party is vilified in the media, an angry, contradictory expression won’t be fruitful).

Cerberus

So my idea was to make a game about controlling the three heads of Cerberus. To elaborate for those who aren’t familiar, Cerberus is a fearsome three-headed dog from Greek mythology that guards the entrance to the Underworld.

There are two ways I was thinking of to go about this: Having 3 players control a head each, or having one player control all three heads.

3 Players:

Each player uses a controller(Plain old game controller or possibly Wiimote) to control the movement of the heads, and to bite and bark at the pitiful residents of the Underworld to keep morale down. The goal will be to keep watch over the entrance of the Underworld and eat any living people trying to rescue their loved ones from an accursed existence. The heads work mostly independently, but some tasks will require multiple players to work together.

I also thought about alternative interfaces like the Leap motion or the Kinect, but I’m not sure if it’s feasible with 3 players.

1 Player:

Use three(or more) buttons to control each of the heads. I imagine it to be a Papers, Please kind of thing were you have to let only dead people through into the underworld, and eat the live ones. You would also have to deal with the occasional escapee (Who can blame them? Shit sucks when it’s always 1000 degrees inside). The difficulty would come from managing all three heads at once, and keeping Hades happy at the end of the day. I also want there to be a boss fight with Hercules at some point.

Alex Lee – Body/Space Ideas

I proposed this: “Your body is a landscape, move to influence the topography, ecosystems, and civilizations that live on your surface”.

The basic idea is to use physical motions to manipulate the shape and dimensions of a space. The the type of motions and the nature of the space could be anything. Here are some possibilities:

-Time is spatially mapped on your body – the center of your body represents the present, and the further out you go the further in the past the corresponding event is. Manipulate your outer body and extremities to change your past and create a new present for yourself.

-Your mind/psyche is mapped spatially on your body, contort your body to “activate” certain emotions. One possibility is that you suffer from anxiety and/or depression and must react to new stimuli. Body-based input might give more resonance to a game like this because your mental/emotional processes are linked to your physical state rather than more

-Two armies are fighting on a battlefield, and you want one to win, but you can’t control them directly. Manipulate elevation to give your automated army an advantage (either by adding high grounds, restricting or funneling movement, creating inescapable troughs, etc.).

-Interact with a body of water by manipulating elevation. Create waves, floods, tsunamis, whirlpools, redefine landmasses. You also affect the marine life, geology, and topography of the area, possibly creating or destroying ecosystems.

-Indirectly control the movement and growth of nomadic tribes by manipulating elevation with your body. The composition of the land and its ecosystems change depending on its elevation relative to its surroundings.

-A system whose components can be displaced and rearranged by your body movements. One example is an office in which you can change the arrangement of the desks and cubicles to facilitate interaction between new groups of people and to mix up the “production pipeline”, possibly leading to a more effective or efficient result. Other possibilities include cities, assembly lines, art studios, etc. This game gives organic control over a system normally perceived as quantitative and/or rigid.

-Rearrange a text using your body. You obliterate and/or reorder meaning using physical actions. If it is a longer work, like a novel, you might make more meaningful “edits” by shifting around entire sections.

-Control the topography of the sky, maybe redefining the boundaries between atmospheric layers with your body. Allowing different layers of atmosphere to interact will create strange weather phenomena that affects the land below.

-Body-based input is imperfect, and will have imperfect results. The desire is to give immediate visual feedback to the player, to help “calibrate” their movements as much as possible, but it might be interesting to withhold that information, so that they have to make already imprecise decisions based on limited feedback. One possibility is to describe the results of your actions in sentences rather than visuals. The game Nested (http://orteil.dashnet.org/nested) plays with the idea of presenting a complex concept using procedurally generated keywords rather than visuals. One idea is a game in which you raise and lower levels of unrest in a country (mapped spatially to your body). For every person that dies, you get the sentence “[insert name] has died due to [insert cause]”. Ambiguous feedback like this makes the player question the morality or purpose of their actions. Another possibility is to flood the player with information, like in Nested, so that it becomes difficult to find important feedback amongst the noise (for example, a game about colliding stars in which the player receives a huge amount of scientific jargon describing every chemical reaction occurring in the stars).

I’m concerned about how accurate the “body-mapping” is and what its limitations are. I would be happy use other input systems, like gesture or voice, if the body thing doesn’t work out. I also have no programming or modeling experience in 3D, so I imagine the visuals will be in top-down 2D (possibly using colors to depict elevation).

Many of the above ideas impose non-spatial concepts (time, emotions, etc.) onto spaces, which feels artificial to me, like there’s a dissonance between the input system and the game narrative/theme. I’m not sure whether that’s a problem.

I am currently most interested in the last idea (non-visual or otherwise imperfect feedback).

alex lee 50 ideas

hi, i used our next units as prompts, enjoy.

Expression
1. Try to illicit a kiss from an NPC face using pleading and seductive expressions.
2. You must invent an expression unique and charismatic enough to become your “trademark” (see Blue Steel in Zoolander).
3. You are shown the expressions of a famous figure (a leader, a terrorist, a murderer, an actor, etc.) culled from footage and must attempt to copy them in real-time, giving you new insight into them.
4. You are an infant and attempt to mimic the facial expressions of your parents.
5. You must convey a concept (a joke, an ideology, etc.) using only expressions. You can compare your attempts to others.
6. You must use outrageous expressions to simulate a werewolf (or other supernatural creature). You succeed if you scare the NPC children.
7. You move through phases of a date and must make appropriate facial expressions for each phase. Different gameplay for men and women.
8. You are a public figure and must maintain certain expressions on stage for extended periods.

Body
9. You must simulate being dead in order to avoid the detection of a civilian-killing terrorist.
10. Your body is a landscape, move to influence the topography, ecosystems, and civilizations that live on your surface.
11. You simulate various animals’s movements with your body, like running on all fours or squirming on the ground.
12. Your avatar is constrained by chains, like Houdini, and their limbs are linked to nodes on your limbs/body. You must escape your bonds.
13. You adjust your posture according to the situation (a date, a meeting, a confrontation, etc.).
14. Simulate a dangerous activity with your body, like walking on the International Space Station.
15. You draw attention from the opposite gender. Accept or reject them using appropriate body language.
16. You control an old or ill character and must move your body according to the in-game limitations (see the grandma in The Graveyard).

Voice
17. You are being abused. Scream loud and long enough to draw a passerby’s attention.
18. Alternatively, you abuse others. Reinforce destructive habits via periodic insults. Tone, pitch, and volume matter.
19. Attempt to mimic a child’s voice in order to lure and kill other children.
20. Your voice is translated into a spectrograph, which becomes the landscape for another game (e.g. a tower defense, an adventure game, a weather manipulation game, etc.)
21. An intrigue/diplomacy game only using voices. Everyone can hear what everyone else is saying. You can “whisper” to certain people, but the command to whisper must first be spoken aloud.
22. Record sounds that then live in a virtual space, like animals. Their behavior and nature depends on the sound.
23. Mimic recordings of bird calls in order to attract them. Eventually, you must make the sounds without hearing the recording first.
24. Plead with a lover to forgive you. Pitch, volume, and tone at the appropriate timings matter.
25. Repeat a speech as it is being read to you. It might be hateful or intolerant in content, and gives you new perspective on it.

Touch
26. Hold touch sensors to hold someone down in-game. It might be ambiguous to the player whether this is a sexual, intimate, abusive, or violent action.
27. Slap touch sensors to hit someone in-game as punishment.
28. Touch a repulsive object to perform a sexual act in-game.
29. Manipulate a physical object that is representative of an in-game object, like the Katamari Damacy yoga ball. Touch spots on the physical object to affect the game world (like touching spots on a globe to congregate tribes of nomads in-game).
30. Touch sensors on your body to cut or mutilate yourself in-game.
31. Knead an amorphous object to masturbate in-game.

Gestures
32. Give a man a handjob via gestures. The better you perform, the more money you earn.
33. You are an exorcist. Pull upwards to pull the devil out of its host.
34. Create stars by sweeping together cosmic matter with your hands and forming a chemical reaction.
35. You are a professional video game player and must simulate the hand gestures they make during a match.
36. Introduce precise control and creativity into a normally rote activity in games, like digging or crafting.
37. Control puppets using your hands, and play out various ordinary and absurd domestic situations using them as characters.
38. You are a preacher and must use gestures to emphasize your points.
39. Employ powerful hand gestures while making speeches as a political leader. The intensity and tone of your gestures must fit various situations.
40. Use hand gestures to control the eye movement of your in-game character (each hand is mapped to one eye). Vision plays an important role, like with the Weeping Angels from Dr. Who.
41. Attempt to kill yourself (you control a knife with your hands). If you don’t slice quickly and cleanly enough, you’ll die excruciatingly.

No Screen
42. You are Phil Fish. Perform actions and the game updates a Twitter account with an exaggerated version of what you did.
43. Create a character and the game dispenses condiments onto your meal depending on the weight and suspected dietary habits of your custom character.
44. Perform terrorist attacks. Your only feedback is auditory news reports that describe the results of your actions.
45. You are a slave. Perform routines correctly or the game shocks you. Alternately, it tightens a leash around your neck.
46. Perform actions and the game outputs programming code indicating what changes you’ve made, and you must understand it in order to understand how to proceed.
47. A game that subscribes you to a random magazine or newsletter whenever you press a button.

Misc.
48. You wake up in a hospital after failing to commit suicide. You must handle questions from family and friends while remaining sane and piecing your psyche together.
49. Assemble a league of woman pioneers, such as Marie Curie, Ada Lovelace, Gertrude Stein, and Virginia Woolf.
50. You are a public advocate for a cult posing as a transformative rehab center. You must attract, isolate, indoctrinate, and enslave addicts who seek your help.

Bubble Escape – Andre, Shine, Zhen

Bubble Escape

Theme: Eternity

Sensor: Photoresistors

Our game is a time-based runner where the player is a bubble/balloon that must navigate through a vertical tunnel by contracting itself to squeeze through cracks, and expand itself to pick up time+ power-ups. The levels are procedurally generated and with enough time power-ups, the player could play this forever.

We used 3 different photo-resistors to control the player’s width, height, and luminance. Various situations would force the player to think about how to conform to the surrounding environment in order to procede before continuing.

The goal of the game is to stay alive as long as possible.

 

 

[DOWNLOAD] Initial bubble squeeze test (with Arduino)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[DOWNLOAD] Gameplay Prototype (without Arduino) 

 

Analog Game: Performance Anxiety

 

         

The Theme: Labor

The Device: Flex Sensor

Squeeze the flex sensor to show your bosses that you can keep up with the excessively demanding corporate work environment.  The on-screen chart tracks your productivity and provides an absolute measure of your insignificance.  Enjoy inspirational quotes as you work yourself towards a state of complete dissatisfaction and impotence.

 

Collin and Ziyun

 

Sneak-Up-On-The-Monster game

The hurdle we’re working on currently is finding a stable application for the IR sensor. Due to its erratic output, we haven’t been able to determine a stable pattern from which we can derive a fun game. We’re considering using a hot/cold mechanic through the use of ice and fire, but we are unsure how to proceed and would welcome instructional input.

Analog Game: Alex Lee and John Brieger

 

Theme: Micro
Sensor: Microphone

Our game is about micromanagement and the player assumes the role of a depressed/oppressed worker in a factory.  Our game has / will have (given that it isn’t done) entirely audio feedback/ story progression, as a voice directs you to follow a beat.  It will proceed as a simple pattern matching game up until the player decides to create a rhythm on their own.   At that point, the game becomes  branching narrative, in which the player can “break out” of their current environment by creating new beats and keeping them consistent.

We’ll edit/update this post as we make more progress.

Lonely Pizza (Mark Strelow and Luo Yi Tan)

This is the prototype for our analog game. It uses two slide potentiometers. One controls the character’s hand, and the other controls the temperature of the pizza. The hotter the pizza, the quicker you can eat, but the more likely you are to get burned. If you move your hand away too quickly, he will drop the pizza, so you need to be careful.

This game is about a man that never leaves his home, but has a crush on the woman who delivers his pizza. Seeing her increases his motivation, so you want to finish the pizza as fast as possible to be able to order another pizza and see her again. If you take too long, however, his motivation decreases. The goal is to increase his motivation so that he eventually talks to her.

In the current prototype, only the pizza-eating gameplay is shown. The story elements of the game would be implemented through small cutscenes, after each pizza is finished.

Link to the Processing and Arduino code:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/13gj4kppc6hu8rc/Pizza.zip

Flatland Perils: Part 2

Still buggy! Got some new stuff for ya, though. New features!

  • the ability to switch between the 2nd and 3rd dimensions with a switch
  • enemies
  • some walls don’t exist in some dimensions

In development by: Shine and Marlena

One Button Game: Boreas and Zephyrus

Boreas and Zephyrus is a one button game about two dueling wind gods.  Boreas, god of the frozen northern wind, attempts to steer a drifting boat to his icy isle.  His brother Zephyrus, god of the warm western wind, attempts to steer the boat towards a tropical paradise.  Each player assumes the role of a wind god and attempts to create eddies and currents to accomplish their goals and thwart their opponent.  Pressing their button launches their god across the screen, realistically affecting the fluid simulation in the center area.

Mac Prototype Demo
Windows 32bit
Windows64bit 

one-button prototype

here’s my shit prototype, it’s part of a conversation game where you press to change your answer. the red text represents your boss and the blue text represents you. if you don’t press anything, it’ll run through the conversation and end. press SPACE right after your boss finishes talking to give a more confrontational answer. you can also press SPACE while he’s talking to cut him off, but that glitches on the first line. currently it has no effect on his next lines so there’s no real point. press UP to restart, but only do it after the conversation’s finished. there’s sound, so put on headphones.

the real game will be way different than this, it’s about getting a raise and you have to control your boss’s mood (represented by variables for rapport and flow). all of the stuff here is just a placeholder. right now it’s like a choose your own adventure, which wasn’t what i was going for at all, it should involve more strategy and be a real ‘game’.

download and unzip to play (i couldn’t get text to work in browser): http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/asl1/desperate35.swf.zip

MacKenzie’s and Tyler’s Game – Respawn

Hi everyone, we have a link where you can play with what we’ve made so far here: http://itbmac.com/games/soulgame/soulgame_webplayer.php

 In Respawn, the player explores what happens in the game after the main character is out of “lives,” basically starting at the point of Game Over. The main mechanic is that the player uses a single button to make the dead character’s soul move between living things on the map. Originally, this was going to be an alternative platformer puzzle, in which you try to shift between elements to get to the goal (a beam of light) that takes you to the next level.

After further consideration, the game is going to be an open-world exploration, in which there is a large map that the player can explore (as a soul), and progressively collect information about why the main character died. This story unravels based on the player’s decisions of where to explore, and into what “things” to move the soul–a short narrative is told by the object the soul is occupying. This does remove the notion of “losing and winning,” but some penalizing/awarding mechanics can be made (such as collecting artifacts, resolving a storyline, running into a “dead” end).

It would be really great if you have suggestions or feedback!

Endangered

So the idea behind this project was to have endangered animals fall down onto earth, and holding down the spacebar would expand the earth to allow you to catch the animals. The idea is to avoid the “not cute” animals.

Now not broken!

Link here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ygjkm58oxni5jlt/Endangered.zip

We also made another prototype based on the suggestions we received in class. Here you hold down the button to either expand or shrink the circles(planets). The goal is to avoid letting the projectile crash into the circles.

Link here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ozuzkgovjuz3zs8/Space.zip

The idea is that the planets themselves have a gravitational pull, so there would be a challenge to balance shrinking and expanding the planets. We haven’t implemented the gravity yet, so all you can do right now it expand and contract the planets.

 

One Button Game: Collector’s Item

      

The game is Collector’s Item. Your mouse is broken but that cannot stop you from adding to your collection.  Add the items to your shopping cart by launching your mouse at the “Add to Cart” button. You can send it forward by holding the mouse button and releasing it. The longer you hold, the stronger the thrust will be. Watch out, you might get your item but the packaging will get in your way.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/lutwyjs27r2alq4/Collector%27s%20Item.zip

Collin Burger

One-Button Game: Follow Me (Work in progress)

Premise:

Follow Me is a platformer that requires two players to work together to traverse obstacles and avoid dangerous environmental elements. The players move and act as a unit and start off in a cave environment. The goal is to escape the cave together without getting killed. As the game progresses, the levels could get more fast-paced and harder, requiring engagement from both player and agreement on which actions to perform.

Interface:

The interface for this game is touch. Using a MakeyMakey, two players must step on aluminum foil leads. They are able to press the “button” in the game by holding hands (long press), tapping once, tapping twice, or tapping each other repeatedly.

Mechanics:

Walking animation example:

Mac OSX + source code

Other Notes:

I wanted to create a one-button game that involved some type of teamwork and utilized a novel interface that took advantage of the Makey Makey such as a “dunk-tank switch” or involving a chain of people creating a conductive link.

One Button Ball Battle (Mark Strelow)

This is my prototype for a one button game (but it’s actually 2-player, so uses two buttons). The two important buttons are the ‘a’ key and the space bar.

 

Moving makes your ball bigger, staying still makes you smaller. If you are bigger than your opponent when you run into them, they will shrink and you will grow a bit. Additionally, being bigger gives you greater velocity, so you can hit harder, but have to be a little more careful.

If you become too small or fall off the platform, you lose. Try to stay moving and hit your opponent at the right times!

 

The application and source code is available here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/44eun20xse92a9f/OneButtonBattle.zip

One Button Idea(s)

Pinata Farm

You raise pinatas on a farm by feeding them candy. The type and size of candy determines how long and in what intervals you have to press the button. For larger candies, you have to wait longer for them to digest it, and for chewy candies you have to hold the button longer. If you mess up, the pinata gets nauseous and can’t eat for a second.

Here is a bad prototype: http://www.openprocessing.org/sketch/109757

I plan to use AS3 for the ‘full’ version and will have randomly generated candy names, colors, designs, 10+ types, 3 sizes, different pinata types, new pinata states (like nausea, contentment), and a way to spend your score. It might also have an ironic element where the farm is advertised as “free-range” and the pinatas are well taken care of, even though their purpose in life is to get brutally slaughtered by children who eat their internal organs.

And here’s some other ideas I was thinking of:

http://gamestormers.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/41/

Courtyard game!

So the idea is that its basically a fusion of the game 24, twister, and the courtyard. After a set interval of time, players must use all 4 appendages to mark 4 squares – all oriented the same way (as in vertical or horizontal) – and make sure they add up to a target number, which changes upon each time interval.

City of Play Report

(Meant to be posted earlier, but since my login wouldn’t work..)

 

I went to the City of Play during the hours when the Social Games were active and played every game available there (Weenis Wars, Bottleneck, Stealth and Searchlight). My favorite was definitely Stealth, with Searchlight coming in at a close second.

 

Stealth utilized the Playstation Move and 4 Move controllers to create a simple game of tag. When the lights on the Move controller came on, you couldn’t move. The light colors had different indications: Yellow was safe, Blue was kill, and Red was out. When the lights went out, you had to move slowly to tag the person with the blue light before the lights came on again. If you got tagged or moved to quickly, your Move controller would turn red and you were out of that round. In a couple rounds that I played, the game glitched and started out one of the controllers as out every turn.

 

Though the concept was relatively simple, people tended to move when they weren’t supposed to. Sometimes this resulted in them getting themselves out. Otherwise, and it was good practice in seeing if you could keep yourself from jerking to tag someone or jerking your Move controller away.

 

Video! http://youtu.be/PsH8sMJYD_c

 

 

As a whole, I was pretty impressed at how relatively simple the (Social) games were. They were super fun and entertaining with a distinct lack of any sort of complexity.

MonsterFeeding_Game MOD

Press”P” to change the perspective and “S’for speedup, “D”for speed down. The “monster” will eat and grow larger and faster. When it grow larger than the screen window, it will end up with a”Game Over”.

Modified the collision function and create a following camera.

MacOSX version with source code : here

Undercover

Premise:

Win the game, but don’t get caught trying.

Necessities:

  • A stack of game cards (easily printed out)
  • Paper balls (easily crumpled)
  • The Number Garden
  • 10+ Players

Setup:

  • Give each player a game card
  • Players are to keep their cards secret!
  • The game card will give the player’s role

Player Roles:

  • For Race: either Robot or Human
  • For Stealth: either Robot, Assassin or Officer

Example Game Cards:

Game Variations:

Race:

The Rules:

All players are given a game card and a paper ball (if enough players then two paper balls).

Players are to keep their cards secret!

All players start at one side of the tile platform.

Robots:

Move number of tiles as instructed on their cards. Robots NEVER move backwards. If a robots card produces a negative or 0 number of tiles to move the robot is to stay still on this turn (move 0 tiles) and then as there next turn move forward 1 tile.

Once Robot has moved, they should wait the number of seconds specified on their cards before taking their next move.

While robots do carry paper balls, they are NOT allowed to throw them. It is best for robots to act as if they are thinking about throwing their paper ball though, so it is not obvious they are a robot.

If a robot is struck with a paper ball, they should walk backwards slowly to the start line.

Humans:

Must move forward in straight line; (can stay still on tiles).

If a human suspects another player to be a human, they throw a paper ball at them.

If a human is struck with a paper ball, they should walk backwards slowly to the start line.

End Game:

The first player to the other side of the number tile platform wins.

 

Stealth (Cooperative):

The Rules:

All players are given a game card.

Players are to keep their cards secret!

All robots & assassins start random positions on number tile platform.

Robots:

Move number of tiles as instructed on their cards. Robots NEVER move backwards. If a robots card produces a negative or 0 number of tiles to move the robot is to stay still on this turn (move 0 tiles) and then as there next turn move forward 1 tile. Robots should turn as their cards instruct. Robots should never move off of the number tile platform. If an edge is reached the robot should look at the tile they are currently on and turn in correct direction depending on the [current tile #]’s parity (odd or even).

Once Robot has moved, they should begin their next move (there is no waiting in this mode).

If a Robot comes within a three tile proximity to another player they should shake hands with the player. If the Robot is killed during the handshake, they should NOT react in any way and should continue moving as before. The Robot is now “Dead”.

If a Robot is asked by an Officer, “Are you alive?”. The Robot should say “Yes” if they have never be killed via a handshake during this game, and should say “No” if they have been killed via a handshake during this game. If the Robot says “No” they should walk backwards slowly to an edge of the number tile platform and then carefully exit.

If a Robot is struck with a paper ball, they should walk backwards slowly to an edge of the number tile platform and then carefully exit. The player should announce their role.

Assassins:

Assassins cans move as they wish. Their goal is to kill as many robots as possible before being killed or before the Officers use up all of their paper balls.

If an Assassin comes within a three tile proximity to another player they should shake hands with the player. If they wish to kill the player, the should tap the players wrist with a finger mid-handshake. If the Assassin is attacked by another Assassin during the handshake, they should NOT react in any way and should continue moving as before. Assassins can NOT be killed by other Assassins.

In this game mode, Assassins are acting as a giant team and are trying to kill as many robots as they can collectively.

If an Assassin is asked by an Officer, “Are you alive?”. The Assassin should say “Yes”.

If an Assassin is struck with a paper ball, they should walk backwards slowly to an edge of the number tile platform and then carefully exit. The player should announce their role.

Officers:

Officers cans move as they wish. Their goal is to kill the Assassins as quick as possible, which will in turn protect the robots.

Officers start the game with (2-4) paper balls depending on the number of Officers & Assassins in game at the moment.

If an Officer suspects a player of being an Assassin, they can throw a paper ball at them.

End Game:

Officers win if at least 50% of the Robots are alive. (Percentage alive can be changed to balance game)

Otherwise the Assassins win.

 

Stealth (Competitive):

The Rules:

All players are given a game card.

Players are to keep their cards secret!

All robots & assassins start random positions on number tile platform.

Robots:

Move number of tiles as instructed on their cards. Robots NEVER move backwards. If a robots card produces a negative or 0 number of tiles to move the robot is to stay still on this turn (move 0 tiles) and then as there next turn move forward 1 tile. Robots should turn as their cards instruct. Robots should never move off of the number tile platform. If an edge is reached the robot should look at the tile they are currently on and turn in correct direction depending on the [current tile #]’s parity (odd or even).

Once Robot has moved, they should begin their next move (there is no waiting in this mode).

If a Robot comes within a three tile proximity to another player they should shake hands with the player. If the Robot is killed during the handshake, they should NOT react in any way and should continue moving as before. The Robot is now “Dead”.

If a Robot is asked by an Officer, “Are you alive?”. The Robot should say “Yes” if they have never be killed via a handshake during this game, and should say “No” if they have been killed via a handshake during this game. If the Robot says “No” they should walk backwards slowly to an edge of the number tile platform and then carefully exit.

If a Robot is struck with a paper ball, they should walk backwards slowly to an edge of the number tile platform and then carefully exit. The player should announce their role.

Assassins:

Assassins cans move as they wish. Their goal is to kill as many robots as possible before being killed or before the Officers use up all of their paper balls.

If an Assassin comes within a three tile proximity to another player they should shake hands with the player. If they wish to kill the player, the should tap the players wrist with a finger mid-handshake. If the Assassin is attacked by another Assassin during the handshake, they should NOT react in any way and should continue moving as before. Assassins can NOT be killed by other Assassins.

In this game mode, Assassins are part of the team specified on their game card. Their team is trying to kill more robots collectively, than the other Assassin team.

If an Assassin is asked by an Officer, “Are you alive?”. The Assassin should say “Yes”.

If an Assassin is struck with a paper ball, they should walk backwards slowly to an edge of the number tile platform and then carefully exit. The player should announce their role.

Officers:

Officers cans move as they wish. Their goal is to kill the Assassins as quick as possible, which will in turn protect the robots.

Officers start the game with (2-4) paper balls depending on the number of Officers & Assassins in game at the moment.

If an Officer suspects a player of being an Assassin, they can throw a paper ball at them.

 

End Game:

Officers win if at least 50% of the Robots are alive. (Percentage alive can be changed to balance game)

Otherwise the Assassin team with the most kills win.

Breakout – Cubing Breakout

Here’s my breaking breakout assignment. I made a cube that has the game screen on all six sides, and changed the way the bricks are arranged and the number of balls, which makes for an interesting visual experience. You can also interact with the cube by using the mouse.

Download it here. The Mac application is in the application.macosx folder

 

 

The Kraus Campo Game

A playground game for people of different disciplines to communicate and play cooperatively

Designer: Shine Li

Goal:
A game lets players from different disciplines encounter and work cooperatively. Core elements aiming for are excitement, surprise, highly engagement, competition and cooperation.

Idea comes from:

“I imagined a place where walking and getting lost in conversation could become an active rather than a passive pleasure; a place to meet friends and colleagues, or encounter strangers from other disciplines…a literal marketplace of ideas.”

–Mel Bochner

Place required:

The Kraus Campo, Carnegie Mellon University

Preparation:

Five minutes

Equipment:

  1. Dozens of paper with letters which comes from the quotation on the wall
  2. Several colored bands
  3. Several colored paper board, the color matches the ones on the bands

Number of players:

Two or four teams of 2 or 3 players each, but the amount of players should be equal for each team.

Time required:

Less than 20 minutes.

Gameplay and Rules:

  1. Each team should have at least 2 people participating. One stands on the status and focus on the arithmetical problem, while the other contributes physically.
  2. The one stands on the statue should finish 3 “24 Game” to achieve the goal. He/ she should manipulate the 4 integers he stands on with any operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division) to get the end result as 24. After finished one game, he/ she should move to another area which has different numbers with the previous squares. It is permitted to move to a different spot if the player feels the numbers around him is too hard to solve, but the integers he/she uses should be different each time.
  3. The physical one should collect the paper with letters that has distributed randomly on the orange road in the garden. The time limit based on the speed of the opposite team solving 24 Game. He/ she should stop collecting at the time the opposite team finish the 3 24 Game.
  4. After the game stops, both teams should use the letters they collected to form words which shows on the wall. The more words one can form, the higher score he gets, but one letter can be used only once.

Additional rules:

  1. The math ones will be handed out the colored paper board, which has the color of their opposite team. After they finished solving the 24 Games, they should raise up the boards, and the ones with band of the same color should stop collecting immediately.
  2. If there will be more than 2 teams participating, they will be divided as groups of 2 teams, and teams compete with the one in their group. They will get certain colors to distinguish with others.
  3. If there will be 3 people involved in each team, the extra one should inspect the other team to make sure the 24 Game has been played properly.

PDF: The Kraus Campo Game

TURN STOP GO

Turn Stop Go!

A fun game for children ages 5-8

Introduction

Turn Stop Go! is a dynamic and educational game designed to teach kids about the importance of numbers and Machiavellian cunning. This infectious little game will make them want to play at home, at school, anywhere! (But they can’t, because it requires the Number Garden.) Parental supervision is advised in case a child slips or feels emotionally neglected.

Players move around the Number Statue and try to knock each other out by occupying the same spaces as their opponents. The last player on the Statue wins.

 

Rules

First, choose an adult to moderate the game. They’ll yell the directions for each round, and will need a stop watch (or an iPhone). Each player chooses a “1” tile on the Number Statue and stands on it. No two players can choose the same tile.

Turn Stop Go! is played in rounds, which each consist of three phases.

1) Turn phase – The moderator shouts “Turn!”. They start the stop watch. Players have 5 seconds to turn in any direction (but don’t move out of their tile). They choose one of the four sides of their tile and stand facing that way.

2) Stop phase – After 5 seconds, the moderator shouts “Stop!”. Players have to stop turning no matter what way they’re facing. Turning again is a big no no and gets them out automatically. Each player holds their hands out and uses their fingers to show the number of the space they’re on (like if they’re on a “1” tile, they hold up one finger).

3) Go phase – The moderator shouts “Go!”. Players walk the direction they are facing (while keeping their hands up). The number of the tile they were on determines on how far they walk – if they were on a “3”, for example, they move three tiles forward. If two players stop moving on the same tile, they compare the number of fingers they’re holding up. Whoever’s holding the lower number is (gasp!) out. If a player walks onto an incomplete tile or off the Statue entirely, they’re also out.

Once one round finishes, the next begins immediately. Keep going until one lucky player is left.

 

More Rules

  • If a player lands on a “0” tile, treat it as a 10. If a player lands on a “6/9” tile, treat it as a 6.
  • Once the number of players dwindle, it becomes more difficult to get each other out. To maintain the level of franticness, the moderator reduces the number of seconds in each Turn phase as the game goes on. Divide the number of players by 5. Every time that many players go out, reduce the Turn phase by 1 second. So once there’s only 1/5th of the players remaining, they would only have 1 second per Turn phase.
  • An optional rule for the moderator, if they feel there isn’t enough interaction, is to call out “Ten” instead of “Go”. Players must move 10 spaces instead of their original amount during that Go Phase. This encourages players to stay near the middle of the number structure rather than camp its edges, because they’ll have more options when the moderator calls Ten.

 

Pictures

Above: A picture of a child.

More pictures coming soon.

Dat Best Games Fest – Luke Schenker

Getting off the bus my mind filled with wonder; what wonders could the Games Fest hold? Could it be a giant life size pong interface, or perhaps a virtual reality simulator? Since I didn’t read the schedule of events, it was up to my imagination…

That is until I arrived, upon which time I got a free shirt and wristband that entitled me to a fraction of a keg to be tapped later on. The day was looking bright, until we formed teams with… strangers! To summarize, it was a strange group. Luckily I had my two fine gentlemen Alex and Mark from Alternative interfaces to back me up!

For the next two hours we wandered around the city doing their revolutionary twitter idea. The idea was simple: put posters up around the city that told people to take a picture of themselves with the poster and tag it “Pgh1” through “Pgh5”, each being one of 5 locations. They had hoped this would cause a trend of people all taking their pictures at the sites and that it would expand to more sites. This was a good opportunity to analyze the downfall of the teams idea, because it had several problems…

First, people passing have little to no incentive to take their picture with it because all it offers is that they took their picture with a sign that is advertising for something they don’t recognize; very few people would stop for this. Second, if they wanted to take a picture anyways, why use a tag that they don’t know what it is. It is for all these reasons that near the end of our putting up signs that Alex and I bailed on the group to see the fountain. It was awesome.

Then we played a game called “Wandering Gnomes”, the idea was simple: everyone gets a card with a phrase to decode and a few decoded words. To decode your instructions you had to ask around if people had the decoded words in your phrase. It was an interesting idea, and if it hadn’t whittled my self-respect down to a nub by the thousandth time I asked if anyone knew “Wishy-washy-woo-tittle-tee” it definitely would have had some promise. However my dignity could handle no more of the game, and the keg was nowhere in sight, so me and Alex left Mark to play with the gnomes.

THE CITY OF PLAY FESTIVAL

After an half-day-trip to FallingWater, I rushed to Arcade Theater; although I only have chance to take part in the social and street games, I still had a great time the whole afternoon.

SOCIAL GAMES

  • Weenis Wars 

 

It was the first game I played there, and its rules is quite simple. Similar to other “Attack & Defense”  games, everyone protects his/her own weenis which attached to his/her elbows and at the same time tries to grab the enemies’ weenis.

It is actually   a “War” game because every player must pay attention to both defense and attack (so reaction speed is most important), and if you want to play well, some strategy such as team play should be considered.

It’s really fun except for some scratches on my arms. LOL

  • Bottleneck

It’s a matching games and reminds me some part of “D&D” (online?) role play games —-the player in the inn who has a list of requests try to find the other players which have the same request and different professions to form a team.  What we need to do is just SHOUT out our requests and occupation. 

The vehicle rule add some difficulties.

  • Searchlight

It’s a cool game not only because it use digital tools to detect the players action, but also because it’s a teamwork game actually even it looks like a competition between two players. 

Hi fellows~ let us mission impossible~

 

STREET GAMES

  • Zombie Ward!!

Zombies!It’s my favorite~ a real space SRPG. Turn & kill, survive & feast, tools & stories~

It’s interesting that after two round, the zombies seems to get intelligence and surrounded the human who had the anecdote to blcok the way of the other humans.

But I still don’t get it how to define when the humans win or the zombies.

 

  • Witness Protection 


My role is a townspeople, but because I didn’t know the rules of the whole game ( I did’t even know all the role types), I just kept searching for the hidden “witness”. Till after the game, I started to figure out the rules and stories. =_=

 

What I got from the festival was:

  •  some tips to make a good game
    • clear rules
    • interaction between players
    •  challenges
  • some exercise 
  • a not-so-bad free T-shirt 
  • found a nice pixel art when I went home

 

City of Play – Mark Strelow

Play Your City Challenge:

My experience with the City of Play was rather interesting. I began by doing the Play Your City challenge, which started off very interesting. We first got into groups, and then held a brainstorming session to come up with a way to make the city “playable.” There were some really interesting ideas generated from our brainstorm, however most would require much more time and resources than we had at our disposal. I felt like we settled with a “doable” idea because we wanted to get something done in the couple of hours that we had, rather than exploring the really cool ideas more thoroughly. We ended up putting posters in certain locations that encouraged people to take a picture and tag it with a certain hashtag on twitter. The idea was to get people involved with the city and with other people that might visit the same places, but there was no real incentive to taking a picture and I don’t think anyone actually did.

Other Games:

After this, I played a few other games, but the one I found most interesting was the “Witness Protection” game. In this game, cards were handed out to a large group of people, and each person was assigned a role depending on what card they received. There was one witness, which happened to be me when I played, as well as a group of people trying to protect the witness, and a group of townspeople. Hidden among the townspeople was a murderer. It was the job of the witness protection group to hide me and keep the murderer from finding me. If 1/3 of the townspeople found me and hid with me, the game would be won, but if the murderer found me we would lose.

It seemed like a similar game to “mafia” (which is, if you don’t know it, a spoken-word game played in a turn based manner, where the hidden mafia try to kill the townspeople without being killed themselves). However, because this Witness Protection game was not turned based and involved a physical space, it seemed to have the potential to be more exciting.

Unfortunately, the game was rather boring for me as the witness. I hid in the bushes for a while, joined by one member of the townspeople before the murderer eventually found us. I think the other players of the game were a bit reluctant in some ways, due to the rules of the game not being very well explained. I think, if the person in charge of running the game had known the rules very well, instead of being a bit confused like the players, the game might have been very fun and strategically interesting.

I think the small problems I noticed were not with the game necessarily, but with the planning. And I noticed this with the various other games I played as well. As a fun experiment I think the games were great and I had a lot of fun trying them out. On the other hand I think the organization could be improved to provide a more satisfying overall experience. One example is the Roaming Gnomes game, which I thought was a very cool social game, requiring people to interact and talk to each other to translate their directions. While the game was fun, the process of checking whether or not the players had succeeded was a bit slow and, at the end of one game, was entirely off. Apparently the answer key for this particular game had been lost or incorrectly printed. Playing through an entire round, only to be told that you “probably” did well was a bit unsatisfying.

Overall, it was cool to experience new games with strangers. Usually, when playing a game (especially one where social aspects such as talking or strategizing are the focus), I am at least a little familiar with the people that I am playing with. Being unfamiliar with the people as well as the games made for an interesting experience, and I enjoyed it.

Breakout: Mother

I hope this is the right place to post??

Click here to download a zip of the game. Unzip it and play the ‘wishyouwereherefinal6’ file. It only works on Mac and uses sound, so turn up the volume.

here

City of Play Report

I spent about half my time doing the Play Your City challenge, in which I and a group of people roamed several blocks of the city and attempted to make small “games” in public environments that bystanders could participate in. I thought the initial brainstorming session was the most productive part of this experiment, as we explored a variety of topics and referenced many past projects that I found exciting.

Of the games I did play, one I found interesting was a quick party game in which players are given Character cards with an Occupation, Vehicle, and three Hobbies. You must find three other people who share a Hobby with you, and go as a group to the moderator in order to receive a Point card as well as a new Character card. All the members in your group must have different Occupations in order to receive a Point. You also can’t score if two members in your group own a Vehicle that matches the current “Danger” Vehicles held up by the moderator. You play until someone gets 4 points.

I felt engaged by this game because of its simplicity and the cute card design. You can learn it in a minute and complete a round in 15 minutes. The game doesn’t require expensive materials or a large space. There’s a small element of negotiation, because you want to convince groups of two or three to stick together while they search for their final potential members, rather than breaking apart to try to match other Hobbies.

I felt some aspects of the game weren’t as polished and/or cohesive as they could be. The scoring mechanic, for example, led to an anticlimactic victory because no one knew how many points other players had. It was like a time bomb that could go off at any moment, but I didn’t get a sense of urgency because it was so abstract and removed from the rest of the game. One solution might be to give players all four Character cards at once, so that other players can directly see how many Characters you have left, and refuse to trade with you (although this would lead to other complications). I feel a sense of escalation is important to a game like this because the core gameplay is so repetitive.

The Vehicles felt extraneous. I never felt they were relevant because 1) they were on the backs of the cards, which no one bothered to look at, and 2) the person holding up the vehicle cards wasn’t near the moderator you had to find in order to score, so you forgot about them. The layer of complexity they added was also unnecessary, because they made the “core” matching gameplay more difficult, which was already at a good balance, rather than opening up new decisionmaking space.

I’d like to see the game expand upon the idea of negotiating with other players. Currently there is no incentive for players to form groups other than to match Characters. Having the ability to form more defined groups with a penalty for leaving could create an interesting new dynamic.

Hey this is a post about City of Play

I don’t know where I’m posting this so if it’s in a weird place on the site I’ll move it away later.

So there were a couple things I learned from playing games at City of Play. After playing/observing games like Bottleneck, Searchlight, Weenis Wars, and whatever that gnome game was, I understood that:

  1. Fewer rules or simple rules make games flow better with players unfamiliar with the game. Having too many rules creates a lot of awkward “you’re doing it wrong” “am I doing it wrong” “yes you’re doing it wrong stop” moments. Although games that have complex rules are fun to play and offer more, when you’re introducing your game to people who have no idea what you’re going on about, it’s probably a better idea to have only a few rules to the game. Weenis Wars did a good job with just “don’t move your feet” “grab other people’s weenises” as the rules for the game.
  2. Don’t assume your players are smart/motivated to play your game. I saw that there were games that required thinking but involved people who couldn’t or didn’t want to, which ended up with a lot of complaining, discomfort, and confusion. Some people just ignore rules or don’t understand how they work, and messes up the entire gameplay for other people. So I guess this means either to 1) only introduce your game to devoted people you know will play it correctly or 2) make your game look interesting enough and debrief the hell out of the players so they know what they are doing and will continue to play as they should. It’s easy for a creator to say “oh, they don’t understand it because they’re stupid” “jesus can you be any stupider” “god why is everybody so dumbbbbb” but in actuality it’s probably the fact that since you made the game you think it’s easy to play (because you know all of the rules, or rather you think you know all of the rules but end up slightly changing them over time to make the game better). We need to understand that people who play a game for the first time each have different experiences with playing games and making a game without considering how players will learn to play it will probably cause unpleasantness when you start to implement it. The problem with the City of Play was that it was mostly impossible to have something like a tutorial and most game creators explained all of the rules at once before letting anyone do anything so when people started to play the game, unless they memorized every word the creator said, they probably don’t know exactly what’s going on.
  3. Don’t make games that go along the lines of “the louder you are, the easier it is for you to advance in the game” that aren’t games related to sound/music. E.g. Bottleneck required very quick communication between a large group of players, so what people ended up doing was SHOUT WHAT THEY NEEDED ALL THE TIME SO THE ROOM WAS SO FUCKING LOUD YOU CAN’T HEAR YOURSELF THINK. That’s not very nice, is it? I’m sure it depends on the game’s rules that makes this eventually happen, but it would be a good idea to rehearse your game to yourself before you move on to each stage, because a concept always sounds good, but games almost never go the way you want them to when you have random people play it.

I’m sure there are other things I probably learned, but I can’t remember it right now. One thing I did enjoy about the chaos that came with using so many random people to play your game was the social interaction and awkwardness that comes with it. The pure ridiculousness of what the game required people to do made me LOL sometimes. I think when user-created chaos is properly addressed and implemented in games, it can show good results.

Lastly, here are some pictures I took (for bonus, of course):

IMG_0979

Weenis Wars

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IMG_0981

omg a video (http://www.flickr.com/photos/87831442@N04/9650744462/)
IMG_0985

Searchlight

Video (http://www.flickr.com/photos/87831442@N04/9650638002/)

IMG_0989

[censored]

IMG_0994

Gnome game
IMG_0995
IMG_0996

That’s it!! Thanks for reading!!!!!!